The Amazon of the sea under threat

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The Amazon of the sea under threat

The Coral Triangle is a vast underwater wilderness that spans the island of Bali, in Indonesia, the northern tip of the Philippines and all the way to the Solomon Islands. Scientists describe the region as “the Amazon of the seas” because of the sheer diversity of life that can be found beneath its depths. This biological treasure is in serious danger.

In this three part series Solenn Honorine takes a look at efforts to save it and the important role it plays in global climate change.



Papuan Villagers Compete for Attention and Cash With Local Turtles

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Today on Asia Calling to mark World Environment Day (June 5th), we begin a series of stories on environmental initiatives being undertaken across our region.

In recent weeks we’ve been exploring the Coral Triangle, a vast underwater wilderness that spans the island of Bali, in Indonesia, the northern tip of the Philippines and all the way to the Solomon Islands.

Scientists describe the region as “the Amazon of the seas” because of the sheer diversity of life that can be found beneath its depths.

Six out of seven existing species of sea turtles dwell here. Among them, the leatherback turtle, or “giant turtle”, a huge animal that can grow up to 2.5 meters long and weigh as much as a small car.

The leatherback is critically endangered, especially in the Pacific Ocean, where only 3,000 females nest each year.

Three quarters of them choose one of four beaches along the remote northern coast of the Indonesian province of Papua.

Our reporter Solenn Honorine recently visited the district of Abun nearby several of the beaches were Leatherbacks nest. 

There, local villagers are helping the World Wildlife Fung to protect the turtles.

Last Updated ( Friday, 22 January 2010 15:41 )
 

Local Efforts to Protect the ‘Cradle of Sea Biodiversity’

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Last week on Asia Calling we traveled to the Indonesian city of Manado for the first World Ocean Conference.

Countries from around the world discussed ways of protecting the regions Coral Triangle, a vital reef and ocean ecosystem wedged between Bali in Indonesia, the northern tip of the Philippines and across to the Solomon Islands.

Arresting the decline of reef ecosystems requires both global and local responses.
 
For Asia Calling Solenn Honorine visited a reef community near Manado to learn more about how local communities, those that depend most on the survival of these wildernesses, are working to protect their backyards.

 

Last Updated ( Friday, 22 January 2010 15:19 )
 

‘Coral Reefs are in an Even Worse Shape than the World’s Forests’

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This week, around 70 countries gathered in the Indonesian city of Manado in order to emphasize the importance of the world’s oceans in combating climate change.

The World Ocean Conference is the first of its kind; even though the seas, that cover 70 percent of the planet, play a major role in the Earth’s climate.

As Solenn Honorine reports from Manado environmentalist attending say the coral seas are in a worse shape than the earth’s forests.

Last Updated ( Friday, 22 January 2010 15:42 )
 

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